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Suicide in America (A Quick Look)

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Suicide in America

mental health, suicide, suicide in america, american suicide, suicide, american mental health

This is an important piece of content. Let’s focus on the personal experience of someone whose life was affected by suicide, including some statistics, and conclude with some ways that people who are affected can get help. Also please note that the below subject matter can be triggering for some individuals. Especially those who have lost loved ones or friends to suicide. Read at your own discretion. 

Suicide rates have been increasing since 2000.

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The rate of increase has been steeper since 2006.

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The rate of increase has been steeper since 2006. From 1999 to 2006, suicide rates rose an average of 0.6 percent per year; since then, they’ve increased by an average of 1.1 percent per year—the fastest increase on record.

Men are four times more likely to take their lives than women.

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Men are more likely to use guns and take their lives impulsively, and they may be more likely to access a firearm. Men are also less likely to seek out mental health care or treatment, which makes them more likely than women to not get help for depression or other mental health issues that could lead to suicide.

In addition, male gender norms can contribute to men feeling as though they must be strong and independent at all times. This contributes to what’s called “the gender silence,” in which men tend not to talk about their feelings of sadness or loneliness because that’s not something that is considered masculine behavior — despite the fact that it’s perfectly natural for both genders.”

More people die by suicide than in automobile accidents.

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Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States and is responsible for over 45,000 deaths every year. It’s more than twice as common as homicide (the 11th leading cause of death), but far less discussed in mainstream media. In fact, suicide was not mentioned once during this year’s State of the Union address—which focused on issues like gun violence and opiate abuse—despite its prevalence among veterans.

In 2016 alone, there were 42,773 traffic fatalities in America: 18% were alcohol-related; 9% involved speeding; 7% involved distracted driving; 3% involved failure to wear a seatbelt.[3] That same year saw 44,965 suicides across all ages: 22% were committed by firearms; 19% included suffocation (such as hanging); 8% used poison; 5%, falls; 4%, drowning; 3%, poisoning by drugs/medication.[4] According to an analysis by The Wall Street Journal , traffic accidents kill roughly 1 out of every 100 Americans each year while suicide claims 1 out of every 88 Americans annually.[5]

Firearms are involved in 50% of suicides, according to statistics from 2016.

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In 2016, firearms were involved in almost half of all suicide deaths. With nearly 40,000 Americans taking their own lives that year, the rate of suicide using firearms was the highest it had been since 2010. The second-most common method was suffocation or hanging, which accounted for about 21% of suicides. Among middle-aged men aged 45–54 years old and those aged 55–64 years old (both predominantly white demographics), firearm use has risen steadily since 1999 and now accounts for roughly 57% of suicides—an increase of 28%. For women aged 45–54 years old (also predominantly white), the percentage of suicides involving firearms increased by 21%.

As mentioned previously, this data can be difficult to interpret because some people who survive attempts will be hospitalized or receive outpatient care without having a formal diagnosis on their medical record: in other words, they may not be counted as “suicides.” Furthermore, there are also likely some cases where someone dies from an accidental shooting after attempting suicide with another method; this could artificially inflate the number reported as completed self-harm attempts by firearm relative to other methods such as suffocation or poisoning.

Suicide is on the rise and we need to do more to help people struggling with mental health challenges.

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Suicide is on the rise and we need to do more to help people struggling with mental health challenges.

If you are feeling suicidal or know someone who may be, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or text HOME to 741741. You can also call a local crisis center. If you’re having thoughts of suicide and live outside of America, contact your closest embassy or consulate. Please do this if you’re feeling this way. You would never know how many people would miss you. You don’t know how many people love and value your input and life. Click here for other resources and hotlines for mental health.

If you’ve been touched by suicide death and want to find support in your community, you can visit our page and share your story here. No pressure to share your story, but it may help you and it may help others to understand who this effects and how much it effects people in our every day lives. If you’ve been touched by suicide, we are with you and care about what you have to say on the matter.

Conclusion

Suicide is a difficult subject to talk about. However, the more we understand it and how it affects our lives, the better equipped we will be to help others in need.

-Jeremy

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